Justice Supreme

In 2009, Supreme Court Chief Justice, John Roberts was publically scolded for ruling against the President. Believe me you, he won’t make that mistake again.

The supreme court has it’s own motivations. Unlike politicians, who are concerned with public opinion, the justices are primarily concerned with the future power of the court itself. If it loses respect, it will become irrelevant. No one understands irrelevance as Supreme Justices who rule on relevance of fact and testimony every day.

As a result, the court often rules on cases in a manner that asserts their power, creates chaos for legislation that does not have every “T” crossed and every “I” dotted, and, mostly, overloads every level of government and society beneath the court with last-minute homework assignments. It’s as if they say, “Don’t bring this to me again. Finish your homework next time. And let that be a lesson to you.”

This different framework of decision making doesn’t cross the minds of political pundits.  · · · →

Google Headed Down

I don’t say it lightly. They’ve pioneered a lot with online search and their Gmail has proven to the world that the market likes “labels” instead of “folders”… not sure why no other email engines have figured that out. Perhaps it’s related to the fact that software is often written by programmers—who tend to think in terms of “exclusive categories” and Norton Commander/DOS file-system directories, forgetting that conversations affect more than one topic at a time.

But… back to Google…

How did they become famous? Why did we like them? What made them different?

AOL earned itself an early reputation for being the first and only company that found a way to spam our snail mail boxes with software. We “marked” them accordingly.

Yahoo! …it’s in the name itself: excitement. But, excitement about what? I mean, if your brand get’s people’s adrenaline going, they’ll quickly leave unless there’s a good reason.  · · · →

Dislike Dislike Button

Are you kidding?

Maybe you got the Facebook invite. The “Dislike” button has been debated since Facebook first made it’s transition from Zuckerberg’s memory to the database of his computer.

After three invites… No. I’m not doing the Dislike Button.

Besides, everyone should know that Facebook’s “Like” button doesn’t actually mean “like”. It means, “Push this through aggregated RSS 2.0 and Atom feeds and use limited permissions to promote it in the Facebook database.”

Dah! I mean, don’t we all know that?

So, if that’s what “Like” means… then what in the world would “Dislike” mean?

Would it count a tally, like on YouTube? Would it block feeds? Would it make sure everyone in the world knows about the article, sees the link, and can comment on the title of something I “disliked”, yet still offered free advertising for it? Do I really need to know if you dislike something? Do I really care?  · · · →

Traffic Light Conspiracy

Traffic Light Conspiracy (mp3)

Alex Jones rambles about new world order… Obama’s DOJ personally verified that the people of Wisconsin support their governor who was re-confirmed, Tuesday… But, for all the hype, I never hear about the greatest hand of evil in the world today: traffic lights.

Think about it…

We hate it when we call customer service and are told to “press one for English”… but the traffic light doesn’t let you press anything. You just have to sit there until it re-routs you.

Religious leaders will tell you to obey the light bulb—applying Jesus’ Command to “love your neighbor” to a set of electronics. Better not offend the Holy Light Bulb.

Policemen have authority to tell drivers to ignore the light bulbs. But too many officers camp next to quiet intersections, making sure you don’t disobey the bulb. I’ve always wondered: If a policeman has the time to sit an an intersection, shouldn’t he be directing traffic to make it operate more smoothly?  · · · →