Keep it Simple

Keep it Simple

Don’t overreach. Don’t overdo it.

It’s easy to think that “high standards” always help. High standards can help, but not if they become entry-level requirements.

Allow people to grow. Allow yourself to grow. Allow “on ramps” everywhere in your life.

High standards are not about expecting every rookie to start out as a seasoned pro. We don’t only want to “set” high standards; we want to reach them.

Search for potential. Allow for the best. Teach and encourage even the worst. When people excel, get out of the way. Above all, look for passion. Anyone can learn anything when fascinated.  · · · →

Call-Out Name-Calling

Call-Out Name-Calling

Name-calling never got anyone anywhere.

Don’t confuse name-calling with “nick-naming”. Nick names are descriptive terms for friends and enemies, terms like “Rocket Man”, “W” AKA “the Shrub”, “President Hair Do”, and “Slick Willy”. But, name-calling isn’t objective, can’t be endearing, and only serves to vent frustration from people who can’t bring the change they want.

Don’t call people “moron”, “brain-damaged”, “stupid”, or “buffoon”. Don’t imply it. Don’t talk like it. In fact, say so when other people do.

Calling names is one’s own surrender. It’s the loser throwing rocks at the tanks entering his city. Don’t ever be that guy.  · · · →

Korean Non-Communion

Korean Non-Communion

It was at the North-South Korean border. An American military official approached the line, accompanied by one or two South Korean officials. He held a megaphone. Stopping just before the line, he aimed the megaphone over the border and explained that South Korea had found the body of a dead North Korean soldier and wanted information on how to turn it over to North Korea officials. As he spoke North Korean soldiers looked at him through binoculars and scattered about like flies until they finally went inside their building and closed the door.

It is difficult to take it all in. Normally, when you try to talk to someone, they listen, receive your message, and pass the message on. But, the North Korean officials seemed to assume that South Korea had some other intentions, as if the South wasn’t saying what the South was saying. That’s not to mention that the South had to communicate with a megaphone because no one in the North would receive a simple message.  · · · →