Ignore the Wind

Ignore the Wind

Danger is coming, sooner or later. Bowing and bending is no way to keep danger at bay any more than being nice and friendly will make a mouse appear less appetizing to a hawk. Face it; danger will arrive anyway. It’s best to be ready.

Stand your guard. Don’t run the failing popularity race. Stay home and stay strong. Be smart. Balance your spending. Stay in a budget. Train and learn. Keep your infrastructure in repair and your needs in supply. Aggressively expand unity among your allies. And, don’t spend one second being concerned about the opinions of your predators.  · · · →

Patience of Ground

Patience of Ground

There rests a line to walk between the extremes of standing in defiance and kowtowing to demands. That line is best called “nature”.

As you stand your ground for something—so you don’t fall for just anything—there’s no need to assert yourself on the ground of others. Do what you reasonably can to accommodate for other’s brokenness and folly—it’s called forbearance. But, don’t overdue “help” to the point of enabling.

Patiently study your direction, your purpose, your methods. By knowing who you are and where you are going and not going, gentle help and refusal thereof wisely follows.  · · · →

Live Statickly

Live Statickly

An “-er” worldview always seeks to compare something to something else. If your goal is to be “better”, no doubt everyone else will eventually think that you think you are better than everyone else—and the truth will be that you probably won’t be.

With taxes and politics its “higher vs lower”; neither is attainable. “Lower” taxes isn’t a number; it is a direction, not a destination, so, by definition, it can never succeed; same with “higher” taxes.

Rather than trying to be “more” or “less”, just be you and your best. Choose clear goals, reach them, then choose another.  · · · →

Oftenly Pronoun… and I mean frequently!

Oftenly Pronoun… and I mean frequently!

I was talking with a random guy on the street, somewhere in Asia. English was clearly his second language, though my Mandarin clearly had no comparison to his English. He didn’t speak Mandarin, though. Things got interesting when he used the word “oftenly”.

“I skate oftenly,” he said.

Oftenly…

Technically, oftenly is not usually a word, but technically it is, but technically it’s the wrong word. The word he meant to use was “frequently”. If he wanted to say that he skated from time to time, specifically times that are so frequent that they “occur oftenly” (proper usage because the verb occur is about time), it would have been proper to say, “I skate often.”

What’s the difference and who cares, anyway!?

English speakers love to argue about grammatical distinctions that clearly provide no further clarity—and may even be right—or even wrong and right differently—and to make such arguments about these clearly unclear differences about right and wrong usage differently, even though they have nothing to do with the difference between right and wrong.  · · · →