Rights or Lifts

Rights or Lifts

Demanding rights and what one “deserves” is a sure sign of immanent downfall. Advocating rights for others is another story—lifting the defenseless from despair. When privileged leaders demand rights for themselves: Look out! That’s a captain plowing directly into a field of icebergs.

Many a successor takes over an organization started by someone else. That new leader didn’t scrape to lift the organization from the mud. Without dirty, hard work, the organization wouldn’t exist at all. Founders don’t take their hard-earned results for granted—they don’t consider results a “right”, but a “privilege to pursue”. Buy stock in lifters.  · · · →

Don’t Listen to Experts

Don’t Listen to Experts

Donald Trump and Steve Jobs made the same career mistake: They listened to experts when they already are the experts.

Taking advice from people who know more is always a good thing. But, that doesn’t always mean taking advice. Sometimes that means trusting your own instincts.

How do you know whether to take advice or to advise yourself?—proof!

Look at your track record. Does your history—your resume, your folio, your record, your wake of failed kamikaze attackers—prove that you knew what was coming when your opposite-opinion “advisers” still don’t fully get it? If so, listen to history.  · · · →

Respect for Masses

Respect for Masses

Usurpers see the masses as mere numbers to exploit to gain populous support for what they want. Tyrants and manipulative bosses don’t view people as intelligent and personally responsible for their choices. They see the masses as programmable by propaganda and nothing more. If the masses disagree with the tyrant, the tyrant blames the propagandists. That’s the paradigm of a psychopath.

But, God views all people as personally accountable for their choices. His view is a stark contrast to that of the tyrant.

These different leadership worldviews make the difference in failure and success. It’s a matter of respecting everyone.  · · · →

How to Help Others

How to Help Others

We must help ourselves before we can help others.

Part of this principle comes from the Law of Basic Experience: One can only teach what one has done.

Part of this principle comes from basic safety in lifeguard training: Don’t become a victim yourself; you can’t save a drowning victim if you drown in the process.

Charity and compassion can become distractions from our own problems. They can even become addictions—both helping others and distracting us from our own problems.

Take time to search your own soul. You’ll make a far bigger difference when you help others by example.  · · · →