Right or Incompetent

Right or Incompetent

You can go to anyone and get an opinion about anything. Why do you think your opinion is worth having? What is your basis? Do you go to the deli or gas station to get an opinion about what medical treatment you should take?

Some people are proven right about politics over and over—who would get elected, which problem is a problem, what scandals are real.

The best way to evaluate an opinion is by results: Follow the money. Follow the results. We must treat results as if they were intended because, if they weren’t then they were incompetent.  · · · →

Capitalism Cap-able

Capitalism Cap-able

Eating the bigger fish won’t make smaller fish bigger. Putting a glass ceiling above the people above you won’t stop you from hitting your head on a glass ceiling. Bringing others down won’t help you ascend.

Big fish eat little fish. Little fish don’t want to be eaten. By keeping the little fish safe, the big fish starve. All you need to do to make all life fair in the pond is to protect the little fish. Preserve their freedom.

Attacking big fish is only a distraction—such an effective distraction that provoking attack could be a big fish tactic.  · · · →

Proven Opinions

Proven Opinions

Everyone wants an opinion, but not everyone understands. This goes for many topics, politics not the least.

What is the purpose of a political opinion?—To be angry at others? To blame others? To think you have all the answers so you can sleep at night? To make the world a better place? How is your goal going?

What evidence do you have that, if you had to put money on your political opinion being right, you wouldn’t lose everything you own?

When you are proven wrong, do you re-evaluate your opinion-making process? Without reevaluating, opinions won’t ever prove right.  · · · →

Problems too Big

Problems too Big

Christians’ reputation precedes them. They do a terrible job at nearly everything, argue with each other all the time, and look down on the rest of the people who keep the world spinning. Why?

It’s small thinking.

They believe that, in one way or another, meeting Sunday Morning is “more valid”. It’s not that Christians think that Christians are better than others; it’s that they think Sunday Morning is better than others.

But, if God made everything, isn’t every day equally valid? Isn’t all “fellowship” equally “real”? If Jesus is so big, Sunday Morning too small for him to fit.  · · · →