Messy Patience in Leadership

Messy Patience in Leadership

Many of us live in a world surrounded by stuff that doesn’t work—square pegs ordered for round holes they won’t fit, things so disorganized not a flicker of hope shines an escape from chaos, people who just won’t do a good job no matter how much extra work it creates for themselves and others. Such disorder requires patient leaders.

The temptation of any leader or foreseer is to push the process along and make life better. Don’t be seduced by this. People’s quality of life must be their own, not their leader’s. Order can be taught, but not bestowed.  · · · →

Killing Cockroaches

Killing Cockroaches

There are two ways to kill a cockroach, one way involves the same way to prevent its intrusion in the first place: starvation. If we don’t have food or water sprinkled all over our floors and in the cracks of our sofas, they won’t last more than a month and they probably won’t move in to begin with. The second way is with poison.

Cockroaches poop and pee and make our houses stink. Outside, they keep the world clean because the rain cleans up after them. They’ll only visit to clean up houses whose keepers don’t clean up after themselves.  · · · →

God’s Perfect Time

God’s Perfect Time

God seems to like to wait until the last minute before solving our problems, but, He doesn’t actually. He doesn’t wait until the last minute anymore than He waits for the first minute; He waits for the perfect minute.

Baking a cake requires the perfect cooking time, neither too long nor too short. Our self-worry, wanting to fly while keeping both feet on the ground, causes us to perceive that God often waits until the last minute to come through. He doesn’t. He does everything at just the perfect time.

It takes getting used to—acting at the perfect time.  · · · →

‘Thrive’ Coaching vs ‘Life’ Coaching

‘Thrive’ Coaching vs ‘Life’ Coaching

Anyone can refine and narrow-down a preferred recreation. Anyone can sit in a chair and ponder one’s own life and what useless hobbies we each enjoy the most. But, profitability—the ability to make the money needed to do what you really want to do in your heart—that can’t come from a psychologist or conversationalist.

Discovering your own profitability requires someone who has discovered his own. We need feedback from friends and family. These are useful. But even more, we also need information, facts, challenges, and someone to teach by example on how to quickly get to the point.  · · · →