Ebolatics

Ebolatics

The Point

I remember when H1N1 was going to kill everyone. But, now, Ebola is no problem.

I remember when the TSA spent 1 billion bucks to make sure airports didn’t let the wrong people fly. But, Ebola is no problem.

I remember when the Constitution, Adoption, and Talk Radio indicated that one was a “terrorist”. Islam was no problem. Now, Ebola isn’t either.

I remember learning that Christians used to heal diseases. But, now, attending Sunday morning with Ebola would be a problem.

…This seems strange. But it’s not from Democrats, Republicans, Atheism, or Churchianity. It’s from chaos brought by political correctness.  · · · →

The World of Lifting

The World of Lifting

The Point

Gladwell’s David and Goliath discusses failure stories from top colleges in America. Some students who attend top schools can be worse off than if they had attended a school that was easier and less expensive. But it would be wrong to conclude that the easier school is always the best.

Attending the best school possible may be a student’s attempt to see what his school can do for him, rather than what he can do for his school. There are two types of people: “lifters” and “leaners”. We may be more likely to soar in environments where we can “lift”.  · · · →

The Forgotten Diligence

The Forgotten Diligence

The Point

Patience isn’t always recognized. Many mistake patience for slothfulness or wasting time. Time is money, but that doesn’t mean we should always spend it. Good things come to those who wait. When we live in haste we tend to forget the value of patience.

Sometimes patience requires action to create the opportunity to wait for something good. This is called perseverance. Making peace, for example, requires perseverance, before results are anywhere in sight.

While good things come to those who are patient, the best things come to those who persevere. As Jesus said, peacemakers shall be called sons of God.  · · · →

Hard Working Sloths

Hard Working Sloths

The Point

Nothing beats good, old fashion hard work. And nothing reminds us of this more than watching a sloth eat. It even looks exhausted having to chew its own food.

Hard work doesn’t excuse the need for hard thinking. Wicked men are too lazy to work, while hard-working leaders often give unintentional injustice from lack of attention to detail.

Laziness comes in many forms and all of it can lead to one’s failure—even failure to rise in the first place.

Diligence is a good teacher. Does hard work support practical needs or is hard work a practical need in itself?  · · · →