Fights and Understanding

Fights and Understanding

Fights and Understanding

Conflict escalates when people use the same words to talk about different things. People agree about their ideas and have neither need nor room to compromise. But because they use the same words to discuss different perspectives, they don’t agree.

“Explaining” is not “excusing”. “Politeness” is not “pandering”.

If I don’t like you, I’ll feed you, not because I’m afraid of you, but because that’s what Christians do to enemies. If you mock me, I’ll listen to you and thank you and love you because that’s what a wise man does to a fool.

Ask yourself: What Would Fools Do?  · · · →

Managing the Management

Managing the Management

Managing the Management

Coming trends are for companies to eliminate managers. By and large, they are useless. Managers were invented in the late 1800’s to push workers, who were deemed “lazy”. The cut will save money and, more importantly, reduce turnover.

Instead of nannies who constantly badger about teamwork, skilled workers will have “leaders”—or “go-to” people. Being  irritable and quirky will no longer get a craftsman fired, bad craftsmanship will.

Managers are not specially trained in the core skill of a company’s product or service—they’re trained in working with people as a skill itself. But a company can’t sell “people skills”.  · · · →

Rights in Riots

Rights in Riots

Rights in Riots

A mother sees her son rioting on TV, then finds him for a smackdown. Police are told to stand down and retreat. The mother is hailed as a heroin, then criticized for standing up in her family more than police in Baltimore.

Rioters try to justify the riots, Sharpton warns not to play with matches, and the Right Wing says there is no excuse for the riots. The Left and Right fail to understand one thing: right or wrong, angry rioters will burn down buildings and angry mothers will smack down their adult children. We need smarts, not just rights.  · · · →

Sunday Marketing Matters

Sunday Marketing Matters

Sunday Marketing Matters

The marketing message of Churchianity is, “If you don’t attend Sunday morning, then you can forget Jesus.” But the implication is, “If you attend Sunday morning, then you can forget the rest of the week.” For the last millennium, most people did either one or the other.

Former Churchainity members, recently disenfranchised, don’t want to forget Jesus, they want to forget Sunday morning and remember Jesus from when they first met.

Sinking business models often use marketing to stay afloat after a change in the tide. Maybe marketing Sunday morning had a reverse effect. Or, maybe it just didn’t matter.  · · · →