The Bible’s True Credibility

The Bible’s True Credibility

The Bible’s True Credibility (mp3)

Bible critics say, “The Bible is useful.” Do Christians agree? Christians mainly seem to read the Bible in preparation for debates, not to personally benefit by reading it.

I think Bible critics just want to say something nice, to sound “objective”, and, thus, be more persuasive. However unintentionally the critics might be right: The Bible is VERY useful—in fact, the Bible’s usefulness could be the strongest testimony for its infallibility. But the Bible can only be as useful as we make it.

Don’t debate the Bible with Christians or critics. Just read it and see what your life proves.  · · · →

How Lawlessness Begins

How Lawlessness Begins

How Lawlessness Begins (mp3)

Law and order begin with governments that respect their own laws. Every leader must follow some rules. When the government follows their rules, the people are more likely to follow other rules. When the government overreaches, law and order lose their societal basis.

America may be reaching a time when political corruption causes chaos throughout the country. While experts debate legitimacy vs need concerning which powers the government has and which powers remain in the hands of the people, a greater sense of self-preservation may deserve a greater priority. It’s not mere statutory law at stake—but law vs chaos.  · · · →

Crossed the Line

Crossed the Line

Crossing the Line (mp3)

The people of Taiwan didn’t want a one-way trade street from China to destroy their economy. The people of America didn’t want SOPA to destroy the Internet’s freedom. But rejected-proposed laws tend to persist, under new names and with growing secrecy.

History repeats, especially among those who don’t learn. Coups are among that repetition. The people don’t want to reject laws more than once. There is a line of tolerance which, if crossed, a military/police coup is foreseeable. By sneaking unwanted law into trade agreements such as CSTA and TPP, governments may have crossed that line.  · · · →

Kooks and Anti-Kooks

Kooks and Anti-Kooks

Kooks and Anti-Kooks (mp3)

Consider options other than merely “dogma” and “kookma”. My father was a kook—until he got cancer and thought it best to live with joy rather than fear. Before his conversion, I often told him that his kook theories contradicted each other. We eventually agreed, but we never stopped thinking—in agreement we thought more.

One doesn’t need to tell wild stories and run the streets naked to believe that presidents can be corrupt. Being sensibly calm and shoving one’s head in the sand are two different things. Don’t be a kook, but don’t be an ostrich either.  · · · →