95 Theses of the Clerical System

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If you are a professional pastor or clergy reading this, this is not about you. This is about the system which has worked contrary to all your good goals and dreams for the Body of Christ, which many other Christians hold in common with you. These theses are about the system which holds you and the rest of the Church hostage.

Once the Body of Christ realizes these few, ninety-five truths, along with many other truths much more profound and insightful along the same lines, many carnal elements in the Body of Christ will burn up. Whatever remains after that is the true, pure Church—the fellowship which is not to be, and, by definition, cannot be, abandoned.

I am qualified to make these statements because I have been through the same fire myself.

Preamble: Definition of the Clerical system

The clerical system, since the institution of “bishops” almost 2,000 years ago, is the system which has defined the “local church” as the primary Body of Christ, the fellowship which is considered “not to be forsaken”.  · · · →

What It Feels Like

I’m a Christian.

I don’t force my beliefs on others. Rather, I enjoy time with people who think differently. But, society doesn’t seem to accept that.

I’m a Christian.

Churchianity hates me if I don’t hate those tho disagree with me. Others who hate Christianity hate me if I believe that ideas like black, white, red, and plaid can be defined.

I’m a Christian.

I have friends who are homosexual. They know I don’t agree with them and they remain my friends. Is this not allowed? Must we agree prior to friendship?

I’m a Christian.

I join the two million and increasing number of Christians, about half of them in Asia, who find that the single greatest thing they did to grow closer to Jesus Christ was to make Jesus their only pastor and abandon clergy. Western Churchianity persecuted them, slandered them, so the Chinese Communists imprisoned them and killed them.  · · · →