Copyright, Content & YouTube

In a recent video I uploaded to YouTube, some background music was playing at the place where I shot the video. That music’s copyright holder made a claim that I was including their copyrighted work. I had the option to let that copyright holder post ads in the video or else to cut out the audio—including myself talking. I chose to cut out the audio because I might monetize the video myself one day.

I advise everyone: Do not make YouTube videos if copyrighted music is playing, even in the background. Ask whoever is playing the music to stop, wait for the song to end, or make the video somewhere else. And, if you own a store or art gallery, do not play copyrighted music in the background. Play music published by more friendly people instead.

I mean, background music, seriously? The audio quality is terrible. Try putting music that bad in a TV series and see if a network airs it.  · · · →

Night and Day Theming

The punchline: We need flat/zen themes with push-button dark/light theme settings that apply both system-wide and dark/light theming per individual app.

I am firstly and lastly a writer. But, Ubuntu was just too attractive for me not to understand development life under the hood. I’m one of the chosen who identifies with both app users and app developers. I stand in the middle and see the future.

For almost two years, I have watched my VPS/Desktop Ubuntu hobby mature into beta. In the process, I have come to understand two best-kept secrets about theming.

  1. Coders and media workers need “dark” desktop/environment themes; writers need “light/bright” themes.

  2. There are WAY too many desktop themes for Ubuntu.

Light/Dark Themes: Writers v Coders

Dark themes are all about eyesight and pupil dilation. We see pictures, videos, and computer code better by looking at light letters against a dark background.

But, desktop publishing apps prepare text as it will appear on white, printed paper.  · · · →